I hope by now you’re convinced of a book cover’s value and that you’ve hired a book designer rather than do it yourself or use a template. But don’t forget the inside!

Wrapping a beautiful cover around a blah interior is a mistake. When inside pages look cheap and homemade, book buyers notice because the typesetting (usually done in Word) is poor and the layout lacks imagination and readability.

Yes, you can purchase the same software used by professionals, but these programs don’t come boxed with the designer’s training and experience! Instead, hire a professional who will fix critical design issues such as the following:

  • Lines of text with too much or too little space between letters
  • “Rivers” of white in the text—word spaces that fall in a distracting pattern
  • Pages ending in a hyphenated word, forcing the reader to hold a thought while turning the page
  • “Ladders” (too many hyphens in a row) and hyphenated compound words, both of which distract the reader

Still not convinced? Look at the following “before” and “after” images of pages designed by the author and given a makeover by a book designer.

Before (click each image for a larger version)

10 Steps to Knowing God (Ch 1 Start Before)

The chapter opener doesn’t look much different from any other page.

After

10 Steps to Knowing God (Ch 1 Start After)

White space above and around the chapter number, title, quote, and icon make it clear that this is the start of a new chapter.

 

Before

10 Steps to Knowing God (Day 5 Before)

The section opener looks more important than the chapter opener! A reader could be forgiven for getting confused.

 

After

10 Steps to Knowing God (Day 5 After)_Redacted

The white space and the icon make it clear that this is the start of a new section but not a new chapter.

 

Before

HappyMind(before) 1

This title page, designed by the author using InDesign, is proof that software is just a tool and that experience and training are equally important.

 

After

Happy Mind(after) 1

Note the new book title and subtitle. Imagery from the front cover really makes the title page pop.

 

Before

HappyMind(before) 13

The shapes and icons lack imagination and polish. The chapter title, constrained in the box, contradicts the promise below of “ever-expanding well-being.”

 

After

Happy Mind(after) 21

The imagery, chapter title overlap, and properly-used white space invite the reader into the new chapter.

 

Feel free to download more interior samples at  https://1106design.com/samples/interior-samples/ and contact me at https://1106design.com/contact-us/ for advice on your book design.