It Takes More Than a Great Cover to Sell a Book

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1106 Design

April 17, 2010

Most first-time self publishers understand the importance of a professionally-designed cover, but then some make a very big mistake and attempt to produce their book interior in a word-processing program.

Quality interior design enhances credibility and makes your book look “real.” Creative book covers generate consumer interest. Creative interior designs encourage page turning and pick up where the cover leaves off to convert that interest into a sale. A graphics pro can complete your book in a timely manner at an affordable price.

Book design is a specialty like any other, and without training in typography and experience in graphic design, a “do-it-yourself” interior can quickly undermine the good first impression a professional cover creates.

There are many elements involved in a successful interior design. Size, binding, paper, page layout and typography work together to present your subject matter in an appropriate and attractive way. An experienced graphic designer creates appealing pages that hold interest and convince the reader that your book is the one to buy. If the interior design of your book doesn’t surprise and delight you, don’t expect it to impress anyone else.

One way to make your book stand out is to adopt an unusual page size and orientation. Standard sizes exist primarily for printing efficiency, but that doesn’t obligate you to use them. With a few limitations imposed by bindery equipment, a book can be almost any size or shape — horizontal, vertical, square, oval or even a star. Standard is another way to say ordinary.

Paper can also enhance your book. You don’t have to use white. There are hundreds of papers in a variety of colors, weights, and finishes. Your designer can show you samples and help you choose a paper that enhances your message, feels good in the hand, and adds a sense of value to your book.

While “non-standard” options will cost more, they could provide the visual interest that causes the buyer to stop and look at your book.

We have all seen confusing ads and articles that leave us wondering what to read first. Novels, directories, reference books, computer manuals, and magazines each require a different approach to page layout. Successful page layout invites the reader in and subtly leads the eye from one section to the next. The right fonts, careful spacing, and a pleasing arrangement work together to make reading a pleasure instead of a chore. An experienced typesetter has the tools to carefully adjust justification, word spacing, and letterspacing to give your text an even “color” that’s easy on the eyes, and that delivers better reading comprehension as a bonus.

Interior book design is much more than decoration. When all the elements of good design work in harmony, the result is a beautiful book, inside and out. Your manuscript represents an enormous effort. Creative interior design will bring it to life — make it a “real” book that you can promote with pride and more importantly, sell.

What do you want to know? What topics should we explore together? How can we help you along your publishing journey? Everyone here at 1106 Design wants to help. Post your comment here or email us using the Contact Us page.

Michele DeFilippo, owner, 1106 Design

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